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OEM : Semiconductor

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Assembly Line

Acceleration Robotics Will Collaborate with AMD to Produce Architectural Blueprints for Robotics Using ROS

Date:

Organizations: Acceleration Robotics, AMD

Acceleration Robotics —a robotics semiconductor startup based in the Basque Country, Spain— will collaborate with AMD, the industry’s high performance and adaptive computing leader to expand its presence in the robotics market through the development of new robotics capabilities for AMD Kria system-on-modules (SOMs) and adaptive system-on-chips (SoCs).

Read more at AZO Robotics

Adaptive Computing in Robotics: Making the Intelligent Factory Possible

Date:

Topics: Industrial Robot

Organizations: AMD

Demand for robotics is accelerating rapidly. According to the research firm, Statista, the global market for industrial robots, as an example, will more than double from US$81 billion in 2021, to over US$165 billion in 2028 (1). Today, you can find the technologies you need to build a robot that is safe and secure and can operate alongside humans. But getting these technologies working together can be a huge undertaking. Complicating matters is the addition of artificial intelligence which is making it more difficult to keep up with computational demands. In order to meet today’s rapid pace of innovation, roboticists are turning toward adaptive computing platforms. These offer lower latency and deterministic, multi-axis control with built-in safety and security on a modular platform that is scalable for the future.

Read more at Xilinx Tech Online

Intel Problems

Date:

Author: @benthompson

Vertical: Semiconductor

Organizations: AMD, Intel, Microsoft, NVIDIA, TSMC

The misplaced optimism is twofold: first there is the fact that eight years later Intel has again appointed a new CEO (Pat Gelsinger), not to replace the one I was writing about (Brian Krzanich), but rather his successor (Bob Swan). Clearly the opportunity was not seized. What is more concerning is that the question is no longer about seizing an opportunity but about survival, and it is the United States that has the most to lose.

Read more at Stratechery (Paid)