Audi

OEM : Automotive

Website | Video

Ingolstadt, Bavaria, Germany

ETR: VOW

The AUDI AG stands for sporty vehicles, high build quality and progressive design – for “Vorsprung durch Technik.” The Audi Group is among the world’s leading producers of premium cars. To play an instrumental role in shaping the transformation as we head into a new age of mobility the Company is implementing its strategy step by step.

Assembly Line

Smart Manufacturing at Audi

Date:

Author: John Sprovieri

Topics: 5G, Defect Detection

Vertical: Automotive

Organizations: Audi

Some 5,300 spot welds are required to join the parts that make up the body of an Audi A6. Until recently, production staff used ultrasound to manually monitor the quality of spot welds based on random sampling. Now, however, engineers are testing a smarter way of determining weld quality. They are using AI software to detect quality anomalies automatically in real time. The robots collect data on current flow and voltage on every weld. An AI algorithm continuously checks that those values fall within predetermined standards. Engineers monitor the weld data on a dashboard. If a fault is detected, they can then perform manual checks.

Read more at Assembly Magazine

Factory Robots! See inside Tesla, Amazon and Audi's operations (supercut)

Industry 4.0 and the Automotive Industry

Date:

Author: John Sprovieri

Topics: 5G, augmented reality, manufacturing analytics, predictive maintenance

Vertical: Automotive

Organizations: Audi, BMW, SEAT SA, Grupo Sese

“It takes about 30 hours to manufacture a vehicle. During that time, each car generates massive amounts of data,” points out Robert Engelhorn, director of the Munich plant. “With the help of artificial intelligence and smart data analytics, we can use this data to manage and analyze our production intelligently. AI is helping us to streamline our manufacturing even further and ensure premium quality for every customer. It also saves our employees from having to do monotonous, repetitive tasks.”

One part of the plant that is already seeing benefits from AI is the press shop, which turns more than 30,000 sheet metal blanks a day into body parts for vehicles. Each blank is given a laser code at the start of production so the body part can be clearly identified throughout the manufacturing process. This code is picked up by BMW’s iQ Press system, which records material and process parameters, such as the thickness of the metal and oil layer, and the temperature and speed of the presses. These parameters are related to the quality of the parts produced.

Read more at Assembly

John Deere and Audi Apply Intel’s AI Technology

Date:

Author: David Greenfield

Topics: AI, quality assurance, robot welding, machine vision

Vertical: Agriculture, Automotive

Organizations: John Deere, Audi, Intel

Identifying defects in welds is a common quality control process in manufacturing. To make these inspections more accurate, John Deere is applying computer vision, coupled with Intel’s AI technology, to automatically spot common defects in the automated welding process used in its manufacturing facilities.

At Audi, automated welding applications range from spot welding to riveting. The widespread automation in Audi factories is part of the company’s goal of creating Industrie 4.0-level smart factories. A key aspect of this goal involves Audi’s recognition that creating customized hardware and software to handle individual use cases is not preferrable. Instead, the company focuses on developing scalable and flexible platforms that allow them to more broadly apply advanced digital capabilities such as data analytics, machine learning, and edge computing.

Read more at AutomationWorld