SICK Industries (SICK)

Hardware : Sensor Systems : Metrology

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Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States

From factory automation to logistics automation and process automation, SICK’s sensor solutions are keeping industry moving. As a technology and market leader, SICK provides sensor intelligence and application solutions that create the perfect basis for controlling processes securely and efficiently, protecting individuals from accidents, and preventing damage to the environment.

Assembly Line

Autonomous intralogistics from indoors to outdoors for a safe and seamless logistics chain

How machine vision works in RIBE Anlagentechnik’s camera-monitored assembly facility

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Author: Carolyn Schwaar

Topics: Machine Vision

Organizations: SICK, RIBE Anlagentechnik

The German company RIBE Anlagentechnik develops innovative assembly systems, including inspection systems, for bumpers. SICK’s machine vision helps to identify the individual components, and it also monitors each work operation. This particular system concept could prove revolutionary for other manufacturers and suppliers as well.

As the level of individualization in production areas increases, so does the importance of special-purpose systems with innovative potential. RIBE Anlagentechnik specializes in delivering added value to its end customers. The company has demonstrated its specific strengths in technologies associated with assembly and inspection systems for vehicle interiors/exteriors and related components. Managing Director Dietmar Heckel regards the cobot and robot technologies with innovative Industry 4.0 solutions and digitalization concepts not only as a supporting pillar of RIBE Anlagentechnik, but also as a cross-sectoral growth field.

Read more at SICK USA Blog

Sensor fusion gets robots roving around factories

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Topics: autonomous mobile robot

Organizations: Omron, SICK, DreamVu

Adam explained that most manufacturing processes are organized around fixed conveyors and robotic systems. To vary the specifications of the end product, human operators are typically needed to move product pieces from one assembly process to another. ‘Increasing flexibility requires more people to handle the work pieces and push them around, but this human intervention does not add much value,’ he said.

For that reason large manufacturing companies are keen to deploy mobile robots to transport inventory and product pieces around the factory floor. These autonomous mobile robots (AMRs) are designed to move and operate by themselves, which means that they must be able to perceive their surroundings and react to them. Visual information is crucial to aid navigation and avoid collisions, as well as to enable the robot to perform simple functions such as selecting and picking up the objects that need to be moved.

Read more at Imaging & Machine Vision Europe

Smart Factory in Actual Practice – Toward Autonomous Production

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Vertical: Electrical Equipment

Organizations: SICK

In Sick’s sensor factory in Freiburg-Hochdorf, driverless transport systems curve around automated production modules and workstations operated by people or collaborating human-robot teams. “The modules are cells in which the robot performs a defined task in a fixed working environment, such as the final assembly of various sensor components,” Joachim Schultis explained, Head of Operations for Photoelectric Sensors & Fibers at Sick AG “The modules are completely setup-free; format and material changes are carried out by the control system operating in the background.”

Read more at Automatica Munich