Lincoln Electric

Machinery : Industrial Robot : Robot Welding

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Cleveland, Ohio, United States

NASDAQ: LECO

Lincoln Electric was founded on December 5, 1895, in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A. An initial $200 investment was used to develop and commercialize a unique, direct current electric motor for industrial applications. What started as a spark of ingenuity flickered and gained momentum. By 1911, John C. and James F. Lincoln invented and launched their first variable voltage arc welder, an innovation that catapulted Lincoln Electric into a new technology and industry that would drive its future success. Each founding brother shaped the organization and left a distinct legacy that continues to define our culture, values and brand today. 125-years later, Lincoln Electric has become the global leader in arc welding and cutting, and is renowned as The Welding Experts® worldwide. With the industry’s leading team of experts and most comprehensive portfolio of solutions, we continue to advance innovation and deliver measurable value to our customers and their operations. We also remain true to our guiding principle, “The Golden Rule,” and share a purpose of operating by a higher standard to build a better world. By aligning all of our stakeholders’ interests through our unique, performance-based incentive management system, we continue to generate value and pursue long-term success.

Assembly Line

Robotic 3D manufacturing providing greater flexibility

Date:

Author: Tanya Anandan

Topics: additive manufacturing, robotics

Organizations: Lincoln Electric, MX3D, ABB

Robots are extending their reach. These multiaxis articulators are taking 3D manufacturing and fabrication to new heights, new part designs, greater complexity and production efficiencies. Integrated with systems to extend their reach even further, their flexibility is unmatched. Robots are virtually defying gravity in additive manufacturing (AM), tackle complex geometries in cutting, and collaborate with humans to improve efficiencies in composite layup. This is the future of 3D.

3D printing is already a multibillion-dollar industry, with much of the activity focused on building prototypes or small parts made from plastics and polymers. For metal parts, one additive process garnering lots of attention is robotic wire arc additive manufacturing (WAAM).

Read more at Plant Engineering